Stanley Kubrick; analogy- dichotomy of adaptations

16.04 – 31.04.18
Chelsea Library  Chelsea College of Arts, London
All the material is from The Stanley Kubrick Archive

Curated by Laura Callegaro and Carla Gimeno Jaria

Stanley Kubrick (1928-1999) was a renowned filmmaker, producer and screenwriter, having made four short films and documentaries and thirteen feature films, Kubrick had a particular filmmaking style which encompassed several characteristics: the use of the music as a pivotal component of the narration, the dark humor, the accurate set design or the realism.   Apart from Fear and Desire and Killer’s Kiss, all his films are based on novels by male writers. Likewise, Kubrick had a unique way of adapting novels, usually altering their structure and narrative. Accordingly, he received mixed reviews for his work, but today Kubrick is revered for his intuition in for the transformative adaptation.

His adaptations, that include a wide range of movie genres, demonstrate his desire to go beyond the aesthetic feature of the film. The filmmaker attempted to extract the crucial points of the story and was always heavily committed to the development of the characters and the ambiance, in order to create the best version of the novel in its visual representation.

Taking the films Lolita (1962), A Clockwork Orange (1972), The Shining (1980) and Full Metal Jacket (1987) as a main focus, this exhibition aims to explore the material from The Stanley Kubrick Archive – located at London College of Communication – to present the diverse processes that Kubrick followed adapting these four novels to films. These four films frame many of the different characteristics of Kubrick’s versatile style of bringing novels to the screen and, similarly, depict his obsession for the duality of humans and the male violence.

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